GoalTwo former television executives ensnared in the latest salvo of the long-running FIFA corruption scandal have petitioned the Eastern District of New York for an opportunity to review cellphone evidence from a government cooperating witness that might have been languishing on the shelf for the past six years.

Carlos Martinez and Hernan Lopez (the “Defendants”)

Price GougingIn early March 2020, at the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, former Attorney General William Barr instructed federal prosecutors to prioritize the “detection, investigation and prosecution of all criminal conduct related to the current pandemic.”  His memos from the early days of the pandemic made it clear that COVID-19 related wrongdoing would be a top

FraudDefendants in the “Varsity Blues” university admissions scandal recently succeeded in their latest effort to beat back some of the charges against them by arguing that university admissions slots are not “property” for purposes of federal mail and wire fraud.  The decision in U.S. v. Ernst (D. Mass. 19-cr-10081) conflicts with the conclusion reached by

moneyThe Southern District of Ohio, where interstate highways stretching from the southern tip of Florida enter the southwestern point of Ohio, usually and understandably boasts a steady stream of interstate drug trafficking cases. Since 2019, however, the District has prosecuted a growing number of public corruption cases as well. In that short time, the United

Fraud“Never let a good crisis go to waste” was an observation supposedly made by Winston Churchill at the Yalta Conference towards the end of the Second World War while he was pressing for the formation of the United Nations.  In 2020, Churchill’s admonition has found a less lofty home with COVID fraudsters who have abused

Spoofing

Two former commodities traders at a major global bank were convicted on federal wire fraud charges late Friday in a high profile – but rare partial win– for the government in a spoofing case. We previously discussed the theory of “spoofing” advanced by the Department of Justice against commodities traders, as well as the difficulty

FraudOn March 20, 2020, the Attorney General ordered the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) to prioritize oversight, investigation, and prosecution of misuse of federal funds distributed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.[1] Now, almost six months later, the DOJ continues to examine instances of “COVID-19 Fraud” for possible civil or criminal prosecution. The DOJ’s prioritization