State of OhioCOVID-19 continues to rage on after months of impacting our lives, businesses, and the economy. Ohio, at one point a beacon of the country’s COVID-19 response, has recently set state records for new daily cases, hospitalizations, and, sadly, deaths. In response to the increased number of cases in Ohio, last week, Governor DeWine announced a

Fraud“Never let a good crisis go to waste” was an observation supposedly made by Winston Churchill at the Yalta Conference towards the end of the Second World War while he was pressing for the formation of the United Nations.  In 2020, Churchill’s admonition has found a less lofty home with COVID fraudsters who have abused

nursing homeSeveral months into the COVID-19 pandemic that has gripped the United States, it is well established that hotbeds for spread of the disease are nursing homes and other assisted living facilities. Tight quarters holding vulnerable populations is precisely the kind of environment in which the novel coronavirus thrives. That fact is made all the worse

On September 30, 2020, the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) announced its latest health care fraud take down, which was its first since the pandemic hit in March 2020. DOJ charged 345 doctors, medical professionals, owners/operators, and others with criminal health care fraud schemes implicating more than $6 billion in total alleged loss amount. Arriving six

Spoofing

Two former commodities traders at a major global bank were convicted on federal wire fraud charges late Friday in a high profile – but rare partial win– for the government in a spoofing case. We previously discussed the theory of “spoofing” advanced by the Department of Justice against commodities traders, as well as the difficulty

The nation is slowly reopening. Businesses showcase signs that proudly announce “OPEN” in bright neon letters. But the legal landscape is different from the pre-COVID-19 days, and businesses should be aware of the inherent risks involved with re-opening and take the utmost care to ensure employee and customer safety to avoid or minimize government intrusion,

FraudOn March 20, 2020, the Attorney General ordered the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) to prioritize oversight, investigation, and prosecution of misuse of federal funds distributed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.[1] Now, almost six months later, the DOJ continues to examine instances of “COVID-19 Fraud” for possible civil or criminal prosecution. The DOJ’s prioritization

moneyThe federal government has been handing out billions of dollars in stimulus money to individuals and companies. These funds have helped businesses survive the COVID-19 pandemic by providing them with low or no-cost liquidity when they are not permitted to operate as they would normally. But stimulus money, like all government money, is a double-edged

courthouseOn July 2, 2020, a federal judge sitting in Manhattan sentenced disgraced entrepreneur Telemaque Lavidas to a year and a day in prison for insider trading. In addition to the prison term, the judge sentenced Lavidas to three years of supervised release including community service, restitution, and fines, which together could exceed $200,000. Lavidas’s conviction

WhistlblowerWhether attributable to the pandemic effect of remote work, layoffs and furloughs, or the slew of recent substantial awards, the SEC’s whistleblower tip line is lighting up with greater frequency. Companies are understandably focused on the panoply of challenges to their businesses posed by the pandemic and its economic impacts, but they ignore heightened whistleblower